Relora Clinical Evidence

Nutrition Journal. 
Kalman DS. Effect of a proprietary Magnolia and Phellodendron extract on stress levels in healthy women: a pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. 2008 Apr 21;7:11. 

Topic: 
Can Relora impact anxiety, stress and sleep in healthy premenopausal women?

Background:
There are well-supported correlations between stress, anxiety, insomnia and excess body weight, all of which can negatively impact health.

Study Type:
Human Clinical Intervention Trial

Study Design:
Randomized, parallel, double-blind, placebo-controlled: Subjects took either Relora or placebo for six weeks. Anxiety was measured using the Spielberger STATE-TRAIT questionnaires. Levels of salivary amylase (which is both an indicator of stress and a biomarker for sleepiness) and cortisol (a stress hormone), sleep quality and appetite were also measured.

Subjects:
40 healthy, overweight, premenopausal women, between 20 and 50 years old (26 completed study). All subjects reported higher than usual levels of anxiety and a tendency to eat more in response to stress.

Dosage:
250 mg, 3 times daily for 6 weeks

Results:
Relora was effective in relieving symptoms of temporary anxiety. It did not relieve long-standing anxiety or depression, nor did it cause any changes in appetite or sleep patterns.

Conclusion:
This pilot study indicates that Relora may offer some relief for premenopausal women experiencing mild transitory anxiety.

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Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. 
Garrison R and Chambliss WG. Effect of a proprietary Magnolia and Phellodendron extract on weight management: a pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. 2006 Jan-Feb;12(1):50-4. 

Topic: 
Can Relora help overweight women who tend to engage in stress-related eating manage their weight?

Background:
Stress and anxiety can lead to overeating. Can Relora help relieve these symptoms and prevent weight gain?

Study Type:
Human Clinical Intervention Trial

Study Design:
Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled. Subjects took Relora or placebo for six weeks. Salivary cortisol levels, weight, stress and anxiety were monitored.

Subjects:
28 healthy, overweight, premenopausal women, between the ages of 20 and 50, who reported higher than average anxiety and a tendency to eat more in response to stress.

Dosage:
250 mg, 3 times daily for 6 weeks

Results:

  • Weight: Subjects in the control group gained an average of 1.5 kg over the course of the study; however, subjects taking Relora did not gain any weight on average. In fact, 75% of the members of the control group gained weight over the course of the study, while only 37% of the treatment group did.
  • Cortisol: The Relora group presented a trend toward lower cortisol levels at the end of the study, particularly in the evenings. In contrast, evening cortisol levels increased in the control group.
  • Stress: Subjects in both groups improved on a number of psychological measures. There was a correlation between self-reported stress and weight gain.

Conclusion:
The results of this pilot clinical study indicate that obese subjects who eat in response to stress may benefit from taking a dietary supplement ingredient containing proprietary extracts ofM officinalis and P amurense. The mechanism of action appears to be through reduction of cortisol levels and possibly perceived stress, thereby helping participants maintain body weight.

 

 

Relora Mechanism of Action

Relora may alleviate stress and stress-related eating by decreasing cortisol, a hormone that can cause weight gain. Relora contains the botanicals Phellodendrom amurense andMagnolia officinalis, which respectively contain anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) compounds berberine and honokiol. Since cortisol causes both increases in appetite and fat formation, a reduction of cortisol results in decreased food intake and less weight gain from fat.