PepZinGI Clinical Evidence

Gut
Mahmood, A, et al. Zinc carnosine, a health food supplement that stabilises small bowel integrity and stimulates gut repair processes. 2007;56:168–175.

Topic: 
Can zinc carnosine affect gut injury and repair?

Background:
Ulcers are painful erosions in the lining of the stomach or intestine. Zinc carnosine is a supplement thought to promote gut health. What effect does it have on ulcers?

Study Type:
In vitro, animal and human clinical intervention trial

Study Design::
Randomized, crossover trial (human portion of study). Human subjects took indomethacin, a drug that can cause gastric injury. Half the subjects also took zinc carnosine, while the others took a placebo.

Subjects:
Rats, mice and 10 healthy human volunteers

Dosage:
37.5 mg, 2 times/day for 5 days or placebo (human study)

Results:
Zinc carnosine increased the migration and proliferation of cells needed for healing the gastrointestinal lining by 300%. The effect was dose-dependent. Subjects taking zinc carnosine experienced a 75% reduction in gastric (stomach) injury and a 50% reduction in small intestine injury with no significant increase in permeability, while those subjects taking the placebo suffered a threefold increase in gut permeability. Gut permeability (or leaky gut) is thought to leave the body vulnerable to infection by pathogens that pass through the gastrointestinal tract.

Conclusion:
ZnC, at concentrations likely to be found in the gut lumen, stabilizes gut mucosa.

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Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
Akima Miyoshi, et al. Clinical Evaluation of Z-103 in the Treatment of Gastritis: A Multicenter Double-Blind Dose Finding Study. 25(5): 1997: 1403-1442.

Topic: 
What is the most effective dose of zinc carnosine in the treatment of gastritis?

Background:
Zinc carnosine is used as a treatment for intestinal ailments. What is the best dose?

Study Type:
Human clinical intervention trial

Study Design::
Multicenter, double-blind dose finding study. Subjective and objective symptoms were measured at 3 days, 1 week and 2 weeks. Symptoms were also assessed by endoscopy, and hemorrhaging was measured as well.

Subjects:
173 subjects with moderate to advanced gastritis

Dosage:
37.5 mg, 2 times/day or 75 mg, 2 times/day

Results:
Both groups saw an overall improvement of gastritis symptoms. Interestingly, there was no statistical significant difference between the two groups by most measures, meaning that the 75-mg per day dosage was just as effective as the 150-mg per day dosage. In the 75 mg group, symptoms were “significantly” or “moderately” improved in 86% of the group by the two-week mark. Similarly, erosion within the gut was “significantly” or “moderately” improved in 73% of the group. Hemorrhaging decreased by 71% and endoscopy revealed that 71% of subjects enjoyed moderate to significant improvement of symptoms. Over three-quarters experienced an overall improvement of symptoms. The supplement was found to be safe for the vast majority of subjects, and 76% found the treatment to be “extremely useful” or “useful” at the lower dose.

Conclusion:
ZnC, at concentrations likely to be found in the gut lumen, stabilizes gut mucosa.

 

 

 

PepZinGI Mechanism of Action:

PepZinGI, a patented chelate of L-carnosine and zinc, relieves heartburn by acting as an antacid. Its antacid effect is greater than those of several agents, including sodium bicarbonate. 

It also works in multiple ways to prevent and heal ulcers: 

  • It inhibits the action of pepsin, a digestive enzyme that can cause gastric bleeding.
  • It prevents a decrease in the content of gastric mucus, which protects the stomach from irritation.
  • It increases the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and ornithine decarboxylase — all of which help heal the gastric mucosa.
  • It down-regulates the expression of tumor necrosis factor, a cytokine that causes inflammation in ulcerated tissue.
  • It’s an antioxidant that can alleviate damage to the gastric mucosa and promote the healing of ulcers.
  • It protects cells in the stomach lining by increasing levels of heme oxygenase and heat shock protein (HSP72), which helps protect cells from stress.
  • It increases gastric microcirculation.
  • It reduces the secretion of acid.
  • It may promote cell proliferation and differentiation during ulcer healing, allowing the lesions to close.