INM-176 Clinical Evidence

Effect of nutrition treatment on ADHD patients. Unpublished paper . Research conducted at four pediatric psychiatry clinics in Seoul, Korea.

Topic:
What is the effect of INM-176 on children and adolescents with ADHD?

Background:
INM-176 is derived from Angelica gigas, an herb used [MT2] in traditional Chinese medicine. Can it help alleviate the symptoms of ADHD?

Study Type:
Human clinical intervention trial

Study Design:
Subjects took INM-176.  Their intelligence, behavioral symptoms, attention, and executive function were measured at base line and again at 4 weeks[B3] .[w4] 

Dosage:
3 doses (unspecified)/day for 3 months

Subjects:
30 Korean children and adolescents with ADHD, between the ages of 6 and 17, (average age 9.15 ± 2.87 years, 19 females and 11 males)

Results:
Significant changes were noted after administration of INM-176 on several tests, including the Adult Attention Deficit Disorders Evaluation Scale Home Version, the ADD-H Comprehensive Teacher’s Rating Scale, the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI).

Conclusions:
“Analysis of changes in clinical symptoms in CGI show significant changes between before BNT intake (4.39 ± 1.08) and after (3.87 ± 1.06) (P<.001) in attention, in hyperactivity, in impulsivity, in executive function, and in cognitive function.”

Journal of the Korean Neuropsychiatry Association
Kim DK et al. A three-month, placebo-controlled clinical trial of INM 176 in the old aged subjects with memory impairment.  2003 Mar; 42(2):254–62.

Topic:
What is the effect of INM-176 on cognitive impairment in elderly subjects?

Background:
INM-176 is a traditional Korean herb with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action. Animal studies and in vitro research have suggested it may improve cognitive function, particularly memory.

Study Type:
Human clinical intervention trial

Study Design:
Double-blind, placebo-controlled. Subjects took INM-176 or placebo for 12 weeks and took several tests of cognitive function.

Dosage:
?

Subjects:
92 elderly subjects with cognitive impairment

Results:
The error rate for subjects in the INM-176 group on the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive section declined significantly, while the placebo group’s errors rose slightly. The treatment group also improved more on the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and the Geriatric Depression Scale as compared with the placebo group.

Conclusions:
“Based on these results, INM-176 may be a candidate molecule for the improvement of cognitive functions, including memory.”


Mechanism of Action 
INM-176, or coumarin compounds decursin and decursinol derived from Angelica gigas, may increase brain levels of acetylcholine, a signaling neurotransmitter necessary for memory and cognition. A deficit of this neurochemical is associated with age-related memory problems and has also been linked to symptoms of ADD. INM-176 produces an effect by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (an enzyme that breaks down acetylcholine). In addition, the active constituents of INM-176 have antioxidant properties that may protect aging brain cells, particularly from the oxidizing peptide beta-amyloid (Abeta).

Journal of the Korean Neuropsychiatry Association
Kim DK, et al. A three-month, placebo-controlled clinical trial of INM 176 in the old aged subjects with memory impairment.  2003 Mar;42(2):254-262.[w3] 

Topic:
What is the effect of INM 176 on cognitive impairment in elderly subjects?

Background:
INM 176 is a traditional Korean herb with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action.  Animal studies and in vitro research have suggested it may improve cognitive function, particularly memory.

Study Type:
Human clinical intervention trial

Study Design:
Double-blind, placebo-controlled. Subjects took INM 176 or placebo for 12 weeks and took several tests of cognitive function.

Dosage: ?

Subjects:
92 elderly subjects with cognitive impairment

Results:
The error rate for subjects in the INM 176 group on the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive section (ADAS-cog) declined significantly while the placebo group’s errors rose slightly. The treatment group also improved more on the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) as compared to the placebo group.

Conclusions:
Based on these results, INM 176 may be a candidate molecule for the improvement of cognitive functions, including memory.

Mechanism of Action:

INM-176, or courmarin compounds dercursin and decursinol derived from Angelica gigas, may increase brain levels of acetylcholine, a signaling neurotransmitter necessary for memory and cognition. A deficit of this neurochemical is associated with age-related memory problems and has also been linked to symptoms of ADD. INM-176 does this by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (an enzyme that breaks down acetylcholine). In addition, the active constituents of INM-176 have antioxidant properties that may protect aging brain cells from oxidation, particularly by the peptide Beta amyloid (Abeta).